"SINGING UNTO THE LORD"

It is not necessary to search the Bible carefully to find repeated reference made to singing; offering praise in song was a common custom. The people were constantly reminded that they must "sing praises to God," and sing "with understanding."

The voicing of praise was so general that it is only natural to conclude of these Bible folk that they possessed a very practical knowledge of the value of singing. To give thanks in speech was not deemed sufficient; the heart filled to overflowing with gratitude for "his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men," found unbounded satisfaction in singing of the mercies of God. The influence of this form of expression was doubtless so evident to them that any other mode of praise lacked the exalting, helpful characteristics of song. In consequence, when help in time of trouble was sought and they were wonderfully sustained through the trial, they would "sing unto God" their strength. Sometimes the seers would cry aloud, "Sing unto God a new song," as though the occasion demanded a song replete with deeper meaning, one filled with love for mankind, one that in every cadence should proclaim to the world their joy for the manifold blessings God had bestowed upon His people.

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A GENTLE REMINDER
June 24, 1911
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