ITEMS OF INTEREST

Moorfield Storey, president of the Boston Bar Association, sounded a note of warning at the recent annual banquet of that organization. He expressed the belief, with President Taft, that the administration of criminal law is a disgrace to civilization, and that on the civil side the law always works benefit to the man with the longest purse. "Men are blind," he said, "who cannot see that we will soon be entered on the greatest contest in history. A struggle is coming against executives, against judges, and against everybody who wishes to deny his fellow-citizens equal rights and equal opportunities.

"The expenses and delays of litigation, even in the best conducted lawsuits, are enormous, and in the hands of unscrupulous practitioner have become a means of oppression hardly distinguishable from blackmail. We must set ourselves to the work of reducing the expenses and delays of litigation. In the present crisis it is our duty to uphold the courts and the law, but our first duty is to make the law an instrument of justice."

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THE NEED OF UNDERSTANDING
April 23, 1910
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