THE LECTURES

A large audience greeted Bicknell Young of Chicago in the Opera House on Friday evening, April 3, when he spoke on the subject of Christian Science. Mr. Young was introduced by Rev. F. A. Line of the First Universalist church, who said in part,—

The superstitions of yesterday are rapidly passing. The world is coming out into the morning light of a new love. Religion is no longer regarded as a mere matter of creeds and dogmas and religious formulas, but is making itself felt as a vitalizing force, a dominant power in life. Out of the efforts and lives of the world's great thinkers have come new and nobler conceptions of God and Christ and man and destiny. With the broadening of individual minds, we note the deepening of the world's intellectual experience; and to-night, with our gaze fixed upon the polar star of truth, we follow in thought as never before its guidance to the Bethlehem of perfect love and life. We look out upon a world which is God's world; we meet face to face with man who is our brother; we look with confidence and truth and love to the Great Master, our teacher, leader, friend, companion, and we sing the praises of a Father whose love is unchanging. We see in that love a love which cleanses, purifies, strengthens, inspires, a love which rides victorious on the wings of being. With one accord the children of God are discarding the creeds of men, and are turning to the Master for life's supreme creed, causing to be written upon the tablets of their hearts and upon the pages of human history the one great word "Love." In the search for truth mankind are learning to express themselves through love, even as did the Christ. We live in an age in which men are thinking for themselves, seeking individually the fount of life and love. If honest in such research and investigation, they gladly welcome every new presentation of truth. Those who would learn are glad to listen.—Correspondence.

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Testimony of Healing
Although I had been a church member for forty years,...
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