TRUTH ALL-SUFFICIENT

The blindness of mortals to their own best interests is nowhere more apparent than in the attempt to make the truth conform to their misconceptions of being and its laws. This is sometimes manifested in a demand that a Christian Science practitioner shall heal a patient who does not even desire the help of Truth and is not ready to give up material remedies, this demand being made on the ground that Jesus healed all who came to him, and that he did this on their own terms,—an assumption which is wide of the facts. From the standpoint of Christian Science the subject of Christian healing is the most sacred that can engage thought; and when we come to consider the work of the Master,—the mighty work for the doing of which he was finally brought to the cross,—we may well take off our shoes, for the place whereon we stand is holy. Mere speculation as to his motives or methods is of no value; the one all-important question is, How can we best achieve the glorious results which characterized his ministry, and thus "reinstate primitive Christianity"? to use our Leader's words. (Church Manual, p. 17.)

Of one thing we may always be sure, namely, that Jesus' constant effort was to do the Father's will, at any cost to human sense. At the outset of his public work he announced, "I seek not mine own will, but the will of the Father which hath sent me." Again, at the close of that glorious career which was ever marked by self-abnegation, when within the very shadow of the cross, he prayed, "Not my will, but thine, be done." This was the one vital consideration, before which every other paled into insignificance,—to do the Father's will himself, and to aid others to do it as did he—by the submission of the human to the Divine.

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Editorial
REGRET
September 15, 1906
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