Signs of the Times

[A. E. Brandt in Pittsburgh (Pa.) Leader]

If the lessons of the war tended toward one point more than another it was toward the principle of unity. Not the unity which is the demand of momentary expediency, but that which comes from the final acceptance of unity as an abiding and satisfying principle. If during the war we were too busy, too enthusiastic, about the purely military side of our enterprises to take account of the drift, the psychological effects were nevertheless flowing from psychological causes. The principle of unification was at work. It may have been ever so silent; none the less it was constantly at work.

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May 29, 1920
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