THE HIDDEN LIFE

Professed Christians cannot read too frequently St. Paul's picture of life as portrayed in the third chapter of his letter to the Colossians. The severity of the reproof which may be conveyed to them by his words is more than balanced by the inspiration awakened by his assurance of what they may become, and his appeal that they fail not to enter into the fulness of their inheritance.

The exaltation of the life he outlines, its gentleness and humility, its unselfishness and patience, its superiority to temptation, its authority over evil, and above all, its unfailing love,—all this might be reckoned but a flight of the apostle's imagination, were it not manifest that he thinks of such a life as altogether attainable for every true disciple, and this for the sufficient reason that he is putting off "the old man,"—is being freed from the limitations of mortal sense,—and is therefore able to demonstrate the life that is "hid with Christ in God;" and it is the revelation or expression of this hidden life, in all Christlike deeds, which he so splendidly champions.

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Letters
LETTERS TO OUR LEADER
March 26, 1910
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