DEMOCRACY AND CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

That democracy, or rule by majorities, is the most advantageous system for the administration of human affairs, providing the people are prepared for it, no one seriously questions. It is not claimed for this system that it is best because majorities are always right, or nearer the perfect ideal of which all serious-minded men must be more or less conscious, than are minorities, but because democracy demands of every member composing a body the free and unobstructed exercise of all his faculties. It demands the use of intelligent observation and power to draw correct and logical conclusions, and enables every member to be of assistance to his neighbor by giving him the benefit of his observation and deductions. Thus, through the mutual cooperation of all included in the fellowship, a happy average of conviction results, to the support of which all contribute. By voluntary consent they have pledged themselves to sustain and enforce the judgment of the majority and await developments.

Sometimes it happens, within a body governing itself democratically, that a clique is formed in opposition to the sense of the majority, having a standard different from that followed by the majority. Sometimes this is justified by the plausible argument that the ideals and line of action represented by the majority are not high enough, that the standard is so unideal that the minority, to maintain the dignity and purity of their own thought and the cause at large, feel themselves called upon to resist the standard represented by the majority and substitute therefor their own alleged higher standard. Whatever argument may be put forth in justification of this course, it is certain that it is unscientific, and has no rightful place as a part of legitimate democracy.

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THE ARK OF GOD AND DAGON
March 19, 1910
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