"Believe also in me"

When the Master uttered his memorable saying, "Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me," he plainly indicated that, if one's heart would be at peace, something more than a belief in God is needed; and that is to believe also in the Son. Although he was addressing his immediate disciples, his words have the same application to his followers in all times and places. What, then, is the true import of his appeal?

The disciples' belief in Deity, like that of other mortals, had been largely a matter of inheritance and education, rather than of personal conviction; but here was the man Christ Jesus, whom they could see and talk with, who had made himself known as actually the Son of God, teaching that it was needful that they believe also in him. He had shown them in his own life that the Father was a living reality, and he evidently intended them to believe in him as the exemplification of their own divine sonship.

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True Dependence
August 10, 1935
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