THE REWARD OF PATIENCE

Patience is undoubtedly regarded by many as a rather negative sort of a virtue, though such an opinion has no support in human experience or in the teachings of the Bible. The very fact that patience is none too easily cultivated goes to prove that it deserves to be classed with the rarest and sternest virtues; indeed, it is so classed by St. Peter in his wonderful second epistle, where he places patience between temperance and godliness, while St. Paul urges that we "be not slothful, but followers of them who through faith and patience inherit the promises." In another place he prays that the "God of patience and consolation" would enable the followers of Christ to be of one mind, that thus they might glorify God.

The most impressive teaching on this subject is perhaps Paul's statement of the absolute justice of God, "who will render to every man according to his deeds." The apostle goes on to make practical application of this great verity in these significant words: "To them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honor and immortality, eternal life." Then, after telling of the direful results of unrighteousness, he returns to the rewards of right doing and says, "But glory, honor, and peace, to every man that worketh good, . . . for there is no respect of persons with God;" in other words, the operation of divine law is unvarying, and what we most need is a clearer understanding of this law, and patient obedience to its every demand.

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"NOW IS THE DAY OF SALVATION"
October 15, 1910
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