FROM OUR EXCHANGES

[Rev. R. J. Powicke, M. A., Ph.D., in The British Congregationalist.]

Israel's prophets were not men before whose senses certain facts revelatory of God took place which were withheld from the common eye. but men able to see in facts—facts of nature or history. open to all—a significance, a truth about God, which others lacked the power to see. This truth they preached as a word of God. Moreover, such truth apprehended, obeyed, and lived become—in themselves or their successors—the precursor of higher and wider truths which the inward eye had grown fitted to perceive. God inspiring men athrill with desire to know Him and eagerly alive to the facts of sensible experience which declared His presence. declared this or that aspect of His character and will,—have we not here a simple and sufficient account of the process of revelation alike in the Old Testament and the New—and one might say. in all times and places? In the New Testament the facts were embodied in Jesus—his words and deeds, his life and character, his death and resurrection.

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November 30, 1907
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