UNDERSTANDING DEMANDS PRACTICE

When we thrill to the perfection of balance and grace demonstrated by a splendid corps de ballet or the superb craftsmanship of a top-ranking symphony orchestra, do we realize what lies behind the exhibition of each individual's skill? Truly great artists achieve a simplicity that belies the endless hours of study and practice preceding their performance. Rare, indeed, is the genius who can acquire or maintain mastery of his art without effort.

This is true in the greatest of all arts, the art of healing and regenerating mankind. Mary Baker Eddy repeatedly associates two basic steps in her instructions to students of this Science: the first is to understand, the second is to practice. Neither step is fully complete without the other. Mrs. Eddy states it very simply in her textbook, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures" (p. 323): "In order to apprehend more, we must put into practice what we already know. We must recollect that Truth is demonstrable when understood, and that good is not understood until demonstrated."

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LISTENING FOR GOD'S VOICE
July 18, 1953
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