Gratitude

THE Christian Scientist is continually expressing his gratitude, constantly giving thanks, for the good which has come into his experience. It may not be that he oftener than occasionally voices his thankfulness aloud, yet in the quiet of his innermost thought there is an abiding sense of deepest gratitude for the spiritual illumination which Christian Science has brought him, and for the power to demonstrate good which came into his life with the illumination. With the Psalmist he can joyfully sing, "The Lord reigneth; let the earth rejoice; let the multitude of isles be glad thereof."

Now, there were those who before they accepted the teachings of Christian Science were anything but grateful. Perhaps much suffering had been their lot. Sickness and sin may have stalked through the lives of many of them like grim specters, causing them to be greatly anxious at times, and filling them with thoughts the very reverse of grateful or thankful. But after the spiritual illumination came, after it was known to them through the inspired teachings of Christian Science that every condition, every thought, every belief that is unlike good is unreal, and the revelation that good is infinite had destroyed the error of sickness or sin which had been holding them in bondage—after the awakening and the healing, there entered their hearts a sense of gratitude beyond the power of human language to express.

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Editorial
Gratitude for God's Glory
November 19, 1927
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