Joy in Overcoming

"Overcoming"—what a word it is, holding a wealth of promise for every Christian Scientist. Hear these glorious promises: "To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the tree of life, which is in the midst of the paradise of God;" and, "He that overcometh shall inherit all things; and I will be his God, and he shall be my son." From the human view of this word we sometimes get a mental picture pregnant with fear and dread, because of the belief that any degree of overcoming must of necessity involve only struggling and fighting, whereas, metaphysically understood, one's thought is lifted by it to a world of opportunity and fulfillment. The young student in Christian Science, and often the more advanced student, when confronted with a problem, is apt to contemplate only the possible struggle and perhaps failure, and so become discouraged at the outset. If, on the other hand, the expectation of victory is cherished, each step in the problem may be taken with calmness, as it presents itself, and the final outcome will be a deeper sense of protection and security because of Truth demonstrated or proved.

We may have problems while yet working out our salvation, but we must be faithful to Principle in applying the truth taught us in Christian Science. Can it be true, however, that every effort for progress in the truth must be sorrowful effort? And are tears and sighs a necessary accompaniment to gaining spirituality? Mortal mind would fain have us so believe, but divine Mind holds no idea of gloom or sorrow. Might we not then the sooner gain divine guidance by entering "into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise"? It would seem from this passage of Scripture, that it is not sorrowful effort, tears and sighs, but praise and thanksgiving that give us entrance into the court of Spirit, the inner sanctuary of Truth. Then let us bring to this problem of overcoming only the quality of thought that will insure this entrance.

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A Lesson from a Cloud
January 31, 1920
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