Peace

Christ Jesus said, "When ye shall hear of wars and rumors of wars, be ye not troubled." These words convey profound meaning to those who are striving to follow in his footsteps, to be Christian Scientists in word and deed, and it is because we have learned through its teachings to know God and man aright, to put away trouble, and to pray somewhat as we ought, to gain a truly satisfying concept of unceasing prayer, that we should be ever grateful for Christian Science.

A fuller, deeper recognition of the possession of this knowledge was unfolded to me on a Sunday set apart for peace prayer in the churches. Our revered Leader tells us to respect "all that is good in the church or out of it," and if true to her teachings we earnestly endeavor to do this; but she adds that "one's consecration to Christ is more on the ground of demonstration than of profession" (Science and Health, p. 28). Words are ineffectual without works. The substance of Christian Science prayer is clearly shown in Isaiah's words, "The work of righteousness shall be peace; and the effect of righteousness quietness and assurance forever." Active right thinking about God and His creation at all times, in all places, is righteousness ("agreeing with right," as the dictionary defines it), and peace is ever the sure answer to this prayer. These two words, "righteousness" and "peace," are correlated in many Scriptural passages. James tells us, "The fruit of righteousness is sown in peace;" and in Romans we read, "The kingdom of God is ... righteousness, and peace."

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
The Rainbow Promise
April 22, 1916
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit