FROM OUR EXCHANGES.

[Churchman.]

When one looks at the temper of the present age, the possibilities are small for making mere intellectual propositions engines for accomplishing reunion. Reunion, even when championed by commonplace men and supported by imperfect methods, is better than the most consistent scheme of disunion. It may take the energy of a Calvin or the patient labor of a Laud to divide Christians; but the master hand of genius is not necessary to teach men the meaning of fellowship and love. Fraternity in practice is worth more than the dialectics of one who would show that all churches but his own are wrong, or that his own has a vein of golden ore which none other possesses.

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March 5, 1910
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