EARNING AND GIVING

The promises of good to the liberal soul are so many that liberality has been assumed to be a virtue to be striven for as such. Consequently men have deprived themselves of good in order to make a show of giving. The benevolent have been envied because of the prominence given to their donations; indeed, subscription-lists have been used to create classes and minister to pride—having the names of large givers in capitals. How different all this from the rule given by the Master. "When thou doest alms, let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth."

Ostentatious giving is not so much giving as it is spending. The main thought of interest does not rest in the good done by the giving, but centers in the prestige of the giver. There is no recognition of the Father who, seeing in secret, provides the reward of good within the heart of the giver of good. The pride of the spender must be sustained, and often he is not scrupulous in his endeavor to "buy and sell, and get gain." He does not make his wealth by earning so much as by exaction. Wordsworth often reminded men how much of life they were missing because of false ideals.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
THE STUDY OF OUR TEXT-BOOK
January 16, 1909
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit