In the course of an address on "Spiritualism," as reported...

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In the course of an address on "Spiritualism," as reported in your columns, a clergyman makes an attack on Christian Science, and I should be glad to be allowed space to reply. In the first place, let me say that there is no relationship between Christian Science and spiritualism, or occultism, with which the speaker classifies it. They are as opposite as the poles; neither is there anything in the nature of mysticism in its teaching and practice.

It is suggested that, because Christian Science denies the existence of matter, evil, and disease, its followers therefore close their eyes to these phases of human experience, thus tending to perpetuate them. This is entirely contrary to the facts. The whole purpose and mission of Christian Science is a direct challenge to evil and materiality in all their forms, particularly that of sin. Basing its conclusions on the allness of God, Spirit, it denies the existence of these as realities, or as forming any part of God's creation. It does not, however, deny humanity's need of salvation and redemption from these things in relative human experience. It teaches that God made man perfect, in His image and likeness, but that mortals are in bondage to sin and disease because of their ignorance of, or blindness to, this spiritual reality. When we come to realize that these evils are no part of true being, nor concomitants of it, they begin to lose their seeming power, and we are freed to that extent from their bondage. So long as we hold evil to be an integral part of existence there can be no hope of salvation from it, since that which is real is eternal, indestructible. The mission of Christ Jesus was to save mankind from materiality and its resultant, sin and disease; yet he said, "I came ... not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me," thus virtually declaring that the things which he lived to destroy have no divine authority.

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