True Law

From early childhood the sons of men are taught to believe in, and give power and authority to, many conditions over which they have little or no control, and which they believe can injure or help them. Often these conditions are given the importance and dignity of laws, and are regarded as more or less fixed and certain.

Thus, there are the so-called laws of heredity, which decree that a child must resemble his parents and forebears, not only in appearnace, but even in physical disabilities and faults of disposition and character. There are the so-called laws of nature and of health also, which children are taught they must obey, or suffer in consequence—laws of hygiene, decreeing that certain bodily exercise, air, food, and so forth, are necessary to physical well-being, even at times to life itself; laws of disease, that certain maladies must grow worse before they can be cured, and that certain diseases can never be cured. In the realm of business and finance, likewise, there are the so-called laws of supply and demand, claiming that under certain conditions lack must prevail, and that under others there may be plenty. And so men obey, to a greater or less degree, willingly or unwillingly, consciously or unconsciously, these so-called laws, which they believe have power to enforce their demands.

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Gratitude
November 20, 1926
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