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[Henry E. Jacobs in American Lutheran Survey]

Properly speaking, the law is God's immutable and inflexible rule of right, prescribing what God would have us be, do, and omit to do. As the declaration of God's will, it is an absolute standard, which is never arbitrary or capricious, but is the true and unvarying expression of God's own nature. The ultimate standard of right and wrong, therefore, is nothing less than the moral attributes of God, His holiness, justice, truth, and love. Man reaches moral perfection only when what exists in God infinitely is realized in man with the limitation only of man's finite nature,—I Peter, i. 15, 16. This is what is meant by the "image of God," in which man was created, and for the restoration of which, in its perfection, the agencies of divine grace are active. As sin is to be otherwise and to do otherwise than God wishes us to be or do, so the image of God is restored only when in all respects man has become what God wishes him to be, viz., when he corresponds with the divine ideal.

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July 21, 1917
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