Wholeness

Wholeness is a universal human ideal, an innate, heartfelt, spiritual desire. Even the thought that erroneously rejects perfection as "too good to be true," usually accepts this synonym of perfection as a practical standard of soundness, health, or completeness, including all desirable elements. The admonition to be "whole" therefore makes a stirring appeal to human consciousness. So effectual was this appeal, voicing the spiritual thought of Jesus, that virulent disease and sin instantly vanished before it.

The word "whole" occurs frequently in the score or more of cases where the gospels quote the language Jesus addressed to those whom he healed, and even where the word does not occur the sense connotes wholeness. Mrs. Eddy says: "The so-called laws of matter and of medical science have never made mortals whole, harmonious, and immortal. . . . Hence the importance of understanding the truth of being, which reveals the laws of spiritual existence" (Science and Health, p. 273). The Christ-command to be "whole," or the declaration that the one addressed was whole, was not that of one mortal speaking to another; it was spiritual man, the idea of God, speaking to the human sense. It was always heard and understood in that way, as proved by the instant and perfect healing that accompanied it, for the human mind and senses do not so perceive man, and consequently cannot heal in that way; neither can they convey or receive such perception or healing. Christ, the ever present, perfect, and only healer, states the truth and synonymity of holiness and wholeness to every individual continually, and the hearing and expressing of that truth is healing.

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Poem
From Cross to Crown
March 24, 1917
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