FROM OUR EXCHANGES

[Rev. R. J. Campbell, M.A., in Christian Commonwealth.]

Difficult thought it be, to make clear what I mean, I insist that the real could not be anything else than the ideal, for it is at once the infinite source and the perfect satisfaction of everything that every soul can possibly aspire to. It may be more and greater—doubtless is vastly more and greater—than the highest we have ever yet glimpsed; but it cannot be less, for it is all. Reality can be no other than this, from whatever standpoint we contemplate it. And wrong and wretchedness can find no place in it, for the simple reason that wrong and wretchedness are experiences which imply inability to get and draw upon ample reserves of life and power; wrong and wretchedness would instantly vanish if we could all manage to do that. And, when I tell you that if we could only get out and up to reality this is what we should find, I might as well add that it is exactly what we are in process of doing. Step by step and bit we are working our way upward toward a state of spiritual consciousness which will put us at one with reality, which is only another way of saying at one with God. "Ye shall know the truth," said Jesus, "and the truth shall make you free." This is what our present earthly discipline is for; it is that we may understand the nature of the reality to which we all belong and from which we have never been separated for a moment, the illusions of sense notwithstanding. We make mistakes, choose false turnings, trip and fall in the mire of materiality, but in the end we shall get home to what we essentially are. There is a "Light, which lighteth every man that cometh into the world," the light of the Christ eternal, a light that ever shines even when the darkness comprehends it not. To follow that light is to tread the pathway that leads to the eternal glory.

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November 16, 1912
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