"ANOINTED OF GOD."

In his last long heart-to-heart talk with his disciples, Jesus said to them, "Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you, and ordained you, that ye should go and bring forth fruit, . . . that whatsoever ye shall ask of the Father in my name, he may give it you." In these pregnant words the Master both outlined and initiated the reign of true individualism, that ideal democracy in which every man is to find his freedom, his quickening, and his efficiency. He is instructed what to do, and he is given assurance of the divine sustenance and support in the doing.

With the Jew, the chosen one had been looked upon as the rare one, the "anointed of God." Endowed with "the Spirit of the Lord," he was to rule in wisdom and lead with might. The term was strongly flavored with the oriental sense of distinction, of exclusiveness and exaltation, so that it brought to Jewish thought only the heroes of their history. Hence, in calling all his followers to the exercise of his own prerogatives and powers, Jesus instituted a new order which spoke as had no other event for the dignity and the privilege not of the few, but of all mankind. He expressed his own responsiveness to this divine order when in his native Nazareth he found in the Scriptures the place where it was written: "The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he hath anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor; he hath sent me to heal the broken-hearted." Having closed the book, he said to his neighbors about him, "This day is this scripture fulfilled in your ears," thus daringly identifying himself before men with the divinely royal figure prophetically portrayed by Isaiah, and accepting the responsibility for humanity's spiritual leadership. And now, in these last moments with his nearest followers, he was speaking to each of them and to the spiritually aspiring of all time, in the spirit of the 45th Psalm, "Thou lovest righteousness, and hatest wickedness: therefore God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness."

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
AMONG THE CHURCHES
November 16, 1912
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit