FROM OUR EXCHANGES

[Congregationalist and Christian World.]

Our greatest concern must be for the simple, the commonplace, the undramatic, the seemingly unheroic, and yet, as the world is ordered, the absolutely indispensable. There is no great cause which is not being halted in its onward sweep by the dearth of lesser fidelities. Men who would die for their country will not go to the polls, or if they do as much as that, they will not exercise themselves to affect the counsels of their parties, the making of slates, the policies and platforms. Our churches are halted not by the want of the great, but by the want of the small. We are told that the church has lost her power because she has ceased to be an heroic and sacrificial church. We must kindle again, it is declared, upon altars smothered by the commonplace the old fire of sacrificial devotion. All this is true enough, but there are perils in it. God does not always open the doors of the heroic for men, and when they begin to open them themselves without fitting call, we are likely to achieve not the heroic, but the mock-heroic. You cannot kindle the high and exceptional fires of life except upon high and exceptional occasions.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
November 25, 1911
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit