Rational Enthusiasm

To be enthusiastic is to live; to be lukewarm and lethargic is merely to exist. Everyone has his choice; and on his decision depend his usefulness, his happiness, his career, his length of days. "Do not forget," points out Mary Baker Eddy with her never-failing incisiveness, "that an honest, wise zeal, a lowly, triumphant trust, a true heart, and a helping hand constitute man, and nothing less is man or woman" (The First Church of Christ, Scientist, and Miscellany, p. 259).

Any unabridged dictionary will convince the reader that "enthusiasm" has an impressive etymology. Seldom does Mrs. Eddy use the word. No occasion therefor. Her life is an example of rational enthusiasm. A genuine patriot rarely mentions patriotism. A kindly, sympathetic man does not roll "love" on his tongue continuously. He lives it unobtrusively. A man deceives no one by carrying a Bible under his arm.

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Editorial
Comprehensiveness in Treatment
August 15, 1942
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