THE LIFE VICTORIOUS

It would almost seem as if the arrangements in business and social life had been made with the view of keeping men from consideration of the real purpose of living. A business will seem to be voracious, assimilating a man's whole energies and his entire time. Domestic and social demands upon a woman will seem to be so imperative that she has no home rest, no peace of mind. When at last health droops and the spur of excitement can no longer urge on the breathless pace, when there is utter weariness or pain to meet, then perhaps for the first time comes the question, What is the purpose of living?

If a man is tending a fruit-bearing tree he has no uncertainty as to the end in view. He nurtures its growth, fertilizes the soil, prunes away useless branches, with one clear object, the development of his tree, that it may bear fruit after its kind. Yet how much more wonderful is a man than a tree! The mellow fruit of all climes, excellent in beauty and luscious in flavor, how faintly does it compare with "the fruit of the Spirit." And how permanent the fruit bearing of "love, joy, peace, ... gentleness, goodness, faith"! When once these have become characteristic of a man's thinking, his mind cannot be again unfruitful but continues to bear fruit unto "eternal life."

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
THE ACCEPTED TIME
September 21, 1907
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit