The Spiritual Idea and Human Need

Our Master said, "Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." To this divine, and therefore eternal and universal, promise and assurance, there is attached one condition,—"come unto me,"—and were it not that the spiritual idea guides "all right desires in their passage from ... a material sense of existence to the spiritual" (Science and Health, p. 566), we would at the very threshold of the opening prison be defrauded of our rights by "carnal beliefs" (Science and Health, p. 263). Some erroneous belief concerning Truth or the proper channel through which the knowledge of Truth should come, some prejudice, some false pride, some form of self-love or fear may darken the understanding and hinder us in our effort to "arise and go" to the Father.

The story of the healing of the blind man as told by Luke, illustrates some of the difficulties experienced in coming to the spiritual idea. Hearing the noise of a multitude passing by, the blind man asked the meaning of it, and was told, "Jesus of Nazareth passeth by." Note the identifying quality,—of Nazareth. Error often begins its work with a contemptuous expression calculated to arouse prejudice and unbelief, and thus bar the advance to a higher plane of thought and experience.

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"That they may bring forth more Fruit."
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