"That they may bring forth more Fruit."

There are educational institutions in this country which teach the laws of agriculture and horticulture, and after learning these, the pupils are required to put them into practice. In such colleges they teach, among other things, the proper way to prune grape-vines. When trimming his first vine, according to instructions, the novice has a feeling of sympathy for the plant, for there does not seem to be much left in the way of foliage when he gets through; it is now only a cluster of brown sticks, and as an ornament, it is quite ruined. He had acted under orders from a superior who knows a great deal about grape-vines, but to the uninformed eye nothing appears but devastation and wreck, after the removal of much that was beautiful and impressive to the eye. Will the result ever vindicate the seeming vandalism?

The purpose was to concentrate the vine's energies on its true mission; viz., fruit-bearing, and a season's sunshine and rain will fill it with purple clusters, while its untrimmed neighbor will bear nothing but leaves. Had it been allowed to waste its energies, it would have been a failure both as a fruit bearer and as an ornament.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
Our Part in Ushering in the Millennium
August 13, 1904
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit