Overcoming Fear

An important sign of the times is the general recognition of the evil effects of fear upon health and happiness, and of the consequent need to overcome it. From the pulpit and the press, from the platform and the school, there are going forth messages urging elimination of this baneful enemy of mankind, in order to insure harmony, prosperity, and well-being. Literature is being searched to find the pronouncements of great men of the past relative thereto, and a statement from a Roman emperor or an early Christian Father, from a Franciscan monk or an American philosopher, corroborative of the soundness of the anti-fear crusade, is hailed with enthusiasm.

Students of Christian Science are agreed that this is a movement in the right direction, a most encouraging sign that the trend of events is upward and onward. But it is observed with something of wonderment that, while no emphasis is spared in making clear the grave necessity of banishing fear, yet no one offers a practical means whereby this desirable end may be attained. To tell one he must not be afraid, without making clear how he may gain his release, is of little value. Is not the case somewhat analogous to that of declaring the urgent need to banish ill health, while giving no sign as to the means of healing disease?

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Editorial
"Blessed are the merciful"
March 3, 1923
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