LIGHT

One of the most important statements in Genesis relative to creation, is this, "Let there be light." Among the early writers but little was known, perhaps, of the nature and properties of light, but its vital importance to humanity was not overlooked by them; hence we find constant mention of it in the sacred writings. God is always spoken of as the source of all light, and at times its entire independence of materiality is emphatically declared. Isaiah says, "The sun shall be no more thy light by day; neither for brightness shall the moon give light unto thee: but the Lord shall be unto thee an everlasting light." Thought was rising still higher when St. John wrote, "In him was life; and the life was the light of men."

It is difficult for us to realize at this time how much light must have meant to people of an earlier time, when they were, as it seemed, so dependent upon the orb of day, and when they probably never thought of light without being conscious of its possible deprivation. Having almost no access to what is now known as artificial light, they were indeed compelled to work "while it is day," for, as the Master said, though in a larger sense, "the night cometh, when no man can work." The significance of one passage in the Psalms is greatly intensified when we know the custom to which it refers. We read, "Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path." It seems that it was customary to have a small lamp attached to one of the sandals, at night, as this not only shed light upon the path but also helped to drive away the serpents which were so numerous in the East.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Article
A LONDON (ENG.) PUBLICATION
May 30, 1908
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit