An Optimistic View

In a late address before the national conference of Unitarian churches, a well-known publicist has cited many encouraging intimations of the growth of religious sentiment, and among other things he notes the public conscience, which he regards as "more acute to-day than at any time in the history of mankind;" the place of temperance in general thought; the recognition of the right of agreement; the increase of the spirit of reconciliation; the more dominant religious spirit in the adjustment of international affairs, and the universal exaltation of character over creeds.

These phenomena certainly support the speaker's contention, but we are quite sure that there are yet other evidences of a dawning day which are deeper, more prophetic of the advance of a truly religious sentiment. Among these may be mentioned the very manifest tendency of thought and conviction toward idealism—the spiritual statement and explanation of things—and the increasing demand for a demonstrable creed.

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Editorial
Learning from Christ
November 7, 1903
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