THE TRUE BASIS FOR HAPPINESS

Have you ever entertained the thought, "I should be the happiest person in the world if..."? Or you may have heard the remark, "I should be the happiest person in the world if my husband (or perhaps some other member of the family) were only interested in Christian Science!" Some fathers feel that they would be happy if their sons would join them in their businesses or take up the profession outlined by them. Some mothers feel that if they could only have their children near them, they would be happy. Occasionally someone believes that the possession of a million dollars would bring him great happiness; another may feel that an opportunity to work would bring him happiness, while others may feel that if they only had their health, they would not ask for anything more. The condition for happiness seems in such cases precariously posited on something extraneous to the individual.

A student who was deeply impressed by always seeing beautiful cut flowers in the office of a dearly loved practitioner thought many times, "Oh, I should be the happiest person in the world if people were to send beautiful cut flowers like that to me." Several years later, on a gray November day, her thought was a deeper hue of gray than the day. Gloomy thoughts were being entertained because she had received news of a considerable financial loss.

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SECURITY
January 26, 1952
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