Using Similitudes

The great Teacher, Christ Jesus, reached his students in a most direct and appealing way. An outstanding example of this is recorded in the first chapter of Mark's Gospel, where we read that as he walked along the seashore he saw two fishermen, Simon (whom later he surnamed Peter) and his brother Andrew. He said to them, "Come ye after me, and I will make you to become fishers of men." What more direct method could he have used with these simple fishermen, deeply engrossed in their occupation, than to meet them as he did on their own plane of experience, and thence point to a higher calling? He appealed to these potential disciples from the point of view of their human interest—the business of fishing.

This was ever the Master's way. He mingled with the people. He observed their activities and their trend of thought that he might winningly present the great truths of spiritual being. He drew his parables and similes from familiar sights and well-known occurrences. He spoke the language of the people, but spoke with such depth of spiritual meaning that his teachings came to be known as "the new tongue."

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