"Let it rather be healed"

The twelfth chapter of Hebrews is an excellent digest of Christian morals, manners, and methods. Certain it is that the lines of tender, wise admonition in this great letter could have emanated only from a deeply spiritualized consciousness.

The writer first exhorts his fellow Christians to keep thought turned constantly to the example of Christ Jesus, "who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God" (Hebr. 12:2). Surely if the great Master never lost sight of the spiritual joy involved in every overcoming of error, his followers should not faint or repine if they find their paths unduly rugged. They are importuned in the exacting race before them, to "lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset" them. Weymouth, in his rendering of the New Testament in Modern Speech, puts it, "Let us fling aside every encumbrance and the sin that so readily entangles our feet."

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Editorial
Perpetuance of Life
February 10, 1945
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