"Vigor, freshness, and promise"

Mortals are held in subjection to traditional beliefs sometimes to an extraordinary extent. Consider for instance the prevalent belief of the comparative shortness of the span of human existence on earth. It is generally held that few may reach their hundredth year, that for most people the span will not exceed the "threescore years and ten."

What must be the effect—first the mental effect and secondly the physical effect—on those who allow themselves to be taken in by this false dictum of mortal mind? Unless it is counteracted by spiritual truth, the individual will inevitably find himself acquiescing in its demand that he shall go the traditional way of mankind. And to his mental mood his body will respond. Vigor and freshness will forsake him; feebleness will come upon him; and then—"the last enemy." It is a pathetic picture, this of human frailty, but, speaking scientifically, an utterly false one.

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Editorial
The Will of God
May 22, 1937
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