A Few Rules

All Christian Scientists desire to demonstrate their unity with God, good,—to find their real selfhood. In order to do this it goes without saying that there must be a continual work of purifying—the rejection and relinquishment of evil beliefs—going on in their consciousness. In all Christian Science churches each Sunday we hear John's statement: "Every man that hath this hope in him purifieth himself, even as he is pure." The question naturally follows: What, then, is the specific method of rejection and relinquishment?

One simple rule is: The instant a thought knocks at our door and is seen as error, it should be denied and refused entrance. It may begin to argue as though it were already within, but, if we are on guard, we can always speak with authority to an error which we have not been indulging. We can insist it is not within; we can know definitely that it does not belong to our consciousness and has no entity, intelligence, or power to claim to be there. If this is insisted upon, and the door kept shut to the belief that the error is ours, or that it is real, we shall be able to cling to the truth which has shown us the error as error and so to prove its unreality; for one can never see evil as evil unless the truth of that situation has first been discerned. The truth which has uncovered the error is always at hand to rebuke and to destroy the error.

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Editorial
The Aim of the Christian Scientist
May 6, 1922
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