Items of Interest

Massachusetts is to have a three thousandacre fish and game preserve on the end of Cape Cod as the result of the efforts of the chairman of the harbor and land commission, who has succeeded in getting trees and grass to grow on the sand dunes, thus keeping them from drifting. There are thirty-three hundred acres of sand owned by the commonwealth on the end of the cape. They form the northwestern part of Provincetown. Race Point light stands at the extreme northwestern angle of the proposed reservation. The ocean at high tide makes up into the sand back of the light, forming a fair-sized but shallow basin called Race run. It is proposed to dam this water and make a pond of it. The fish and game commission has promised to put fish here and in several other ponds in the reservation. A public park may be made out of this former waste of dunes, and a refuge afforded for the thousands of sea birds that frequent the New England shores. No hunting or fishing will be allowed in this preserve. The possibility of having such a reservation on Cape Cod grew out of the success achieved in getting trees and grass to grow in the sand. Brush was distributed over the sand and grass planted between. This has taken hold.

Mt. Washington, in New Hampshire, is the nation's property at last. The government and the owners have now agreed upon the purchase price, the foresters are satisfied with the terms, and it is altogether probable that the forest reservation commission will at once authorize the transaction. This is the most important purchase that the government has made in connection with the White Mountain National Forest establishment. Already the government owns some of the summits of the Presidential range, Madison and Adams and their northern slopes. This latest purchase of thirty-five thousand acres includes all of the great central peak, Mt. Washington, together with its flanks and spurs and six other Presidential peaks as well, Clay, Jefferson, and Adams of the northern group, with Monroe, Franklin, and Pleasant in the southern chain. Included within this area are the Great gulf, a wild ravine six miles long on the easterly side of Mt. Washington, and the Huntington and Tuckerman ravines, where, in ages past, glaciers dwelt.

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The Perfect Concept
September 12, 1914
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