"WHY ART THOU CAST DOWN?"

The psalmist's query, "Why art thou cast down, O my soul?" is of deep significance to students of Christian Science, especially when they ponder their Leader's words respecting the same. She quotes from the forty-second psalm, in which these words occur, first the mournful question, then the response of spiritual sense, which says, "Hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God." Then she adds these words from another psalm: "Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; who healeth all thy diseases," and asks, "This being the case, what need have we of drugs, hygiene, and medical therapeutics, if these are not man's preservers?" (Christian Science versus Pantheism, p. 4).

The psalms give a wonderful model for prayer, for while the downcast human sense pours forth its plaint, spiritual sense declares for the permanence and power of divine law, and in this we find a picture of all human experience, its manifold sorrows and sufferings, with the light of spiritual being but faintly discerned. At the same time we see throughout the entire Scriptures, as in present-day experience, how efficacious is even a gleam of spiritual understanding, for this light, leading ever to its divine source, becomes brighter and brighter, the hope in God's power to restore health becoming in due season the realization of Truth's majesty expressed in the words, "Who redeemeth thy life from destruction; who crowneth thee with lovingkindness and tender mercies."

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Editorial
COMING TO OUR OWN
May 3, 1913
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