THE POINT OF VIEW

The intelligent reader desires to be correctly informed, and he always seeks to gain the view-point of the winter. He realizes how difficult it is to make one's self understood, especially if the ideas advanced are new or contrary to individual experience; therefore, for the time being, at least, he tries to consider the subject in the light in which it is understood and presented by another.

Many persons fail to realize the importance of considering the author's point of view. From the reader's standpoint of belief the conclusion may appear to be decidedly erroneous, but before he gives expression to his opinion in the matter he should consider whether the conclusion is incorrect when regarded from the point of observation of another. That which is reasonable and consistent to one person, may appear to be inconsistent and unreasonable to another; and this is not because one is more intelligent than the other, but because the beliefs and experiences of the former have been unlike those of the latter. That which compels the readjustment of opinions, and especially the renunciation of long-cherished theories, is not always kindly received, for while mortal man is always delighted when it is proven that he is right, he is seldom well pleased when compelled to admit that he is wrong.

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