THE TRUE VIEW OF MAN

Sir Francis Bacon, who flourished in the sixteenth century, was a mental giant but a moral pigmy, and "pigmies are pigmies still, though perched on Alps," says Pope. The stupendous so-called intellect of Bacon, which elevated him to the distinction of father of inductive philosophy, did not save him from moral recklessness and wreckage. Had Bacon deduced man from God, instead of reasoning from a part to the whole, he would not have entertained the erroneous premise upon which he built wrong conclusions. For instance, he said that there were three ways of looking at a man: the way God looks at him, the way his neighbors look at him, and the way he looks at himself. As a matter of fact, Christian Science shows us but one way of looking at a man: the way God looks at him.

In the Christian Science text-book Mrs. Eddy urges the true deductive philosophy that must sooner or later revolutionize the thought of the world, the thought said to be born in the human brain. Mortals may have a big belief of brain, but, according to Christian Science, the claim that somebody thinks blinds men to the fact that there is but one Mind, God, and consequently only one real thinker and thought, the unique, all-inclusive "infinite Mind and its infinite manifestation," because "the allness of Deity is His oneness" (Science and Health, pp. 468, 267). The manifest fact is that matter cannot think, and this disposes of the human brain, except as a belief of a thinking machine. Such being the case, one mortal cannot have an original thought about another, nor can he have an original thought about himself.

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