"I say unto thee arise"

It is the mission and end of Christian education to bring the spiritual meaning of the great facts of religious history into individual experience, to epitomize and embody in man the providential leadership of mankind. We reach the true interpretation of the life of Jesus only as we come to apprehend that since he lived our life for us, and thereby became our Way-shower, all the supreme events of his history are to be brought within the embrace of our human consciousness until we shall have gained that comprehensiveness and enrichment of experience to which he referred when he prayed, "I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one."

It thus transpires that while the hope and confidence of the believer in historic Christianity may be supported for the most part by his conviction of the truth of the objective works of the Master, the faith of the believer in Christ is grounded in his own subjective experience of these works. The one finds a degree of assurance and satisfaction in the acceptance of the healing of the blind man, or in our Lord's great Easter victory; the other, a peace and joy which passeth knowledge in the achievement of spiritual vision, the conscious resurrection from the domination of materiality, the demonstrable presence of Immanuel.

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Editorial
Nature and Science
April 2, 1904
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