Christ and the Evildoer

A well-known judge has recently said, "I do not believe in putting people to death for any crime. They should be properly confined so they can hurt no one. If a man lives after death, by putting him to death we only transfer him to another state of existence. May he not be just as mischievous there as he was here? That may be an amusing suggestion, but it is logical. What right have we to put him into this other existence?"

This strong word from a judicial authority is one of many evidences of a very great change in the eschatology of the general thought. Though it still has a place in much theological statement, the idea that death settles any problem is rapidly passing. Men now see that the mere ending of so-called bodily life can have nothing to do with the acquirement of character, no determinative relation to humanity's loves and hates, and hence that while the suicide may jump out of this arena of experience, he finds thereby no escape from himself, from duty, from the law of being, or from God.

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A Gift from Mrs. Eddy
January 9, 1904
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