Truth's Invigorating Power

After a more or less prolonged period of work one may seem to experience a sense of tiredness. Perhaps the belief is that the work has been monotonous, or strenuous, and that it called for continuous attention and effort. Or one may have been anxious or worried about it. Frequently, however, it is not the nature of the work but the thought one entertains concerning it which produces the sense of fatigue. It is a well-known fact that in a happy state of mind men will labor for much longer periods without feeling tired than would be possible for them were they perplexed and worried.

If we find ourselves liable to tiredness in the performance of our daily tasks, which presumably are normal, we should be on guard—something needs correction. Obviously, we are accepting the suggestion of mortal mind that there is a cause for weariness or fatigue, a cause which can produce inharmony. A suggestion such as this is part of the mesmeric activity of supposititious mortal mind, which claims to exist and to function in opposition to perfect divine Mind.

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Editorial
"Your divine right"
June 12, 1937
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