Trials—Their Value

It cannot be denied that to human sense mortals are subject to many a trial. From the cradle onwards there is constant struggle, and often much suffering. "Man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward," were the words of Eliphaz the Temanite to Job in his affliction; and they well express what is the too common lot of mankind. But while this is so, there is another side to the question: men are by no means subject to trials and sorrow and suffering alone. The lives of many of them are on the whole glad lives, often happy lives, because lived in the steadfast endeavor to know and to reflect God. Still—not a single mortal is free of trials.

Now there is a reason for these trials; and a very simple reason it is, as Christian Science shows. Every difficulty springs from mortals' erroneous belief in the reality of matter, the erroneous belief that in matter abide intelligence and sensation, and that in consequence matter is able to confer happiness upon them. Thus material sense is the deceiver; for never does indulgence in materiality bring lasting happiness, but always disappointment and often pain; in other words, tribulations or trials.

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Editorial
Humility
May 11, 1929
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