Freedom

IT is not uncommon among mortals for a person to attempt to exercise restraining and undue influence over his associates, whether they be his fellow-workers, the members of his household, his pupils in public or private schools,—over those, in brief, with whom one establishes human relations of whatsoever character. This restraint is frequently exercised with the desire to benefit the persons whose liberty is being circumscribed. Often it is due to the concern one feels for another's welfare; yet, invariably, unless it be done with scientific understanding, it produces an effect quite the opposite to that which is intended. Instead of arousing a sense of gratitude for assistance rendered and solicitude expressed, it more likely stirs a feeling of resentment, even of hatred, a condition out of which can come nothing good.

So carefully do the truly wise handle this problem that they are little inclined to do aught but think rightly of another, holding to the facts of being, and of God's government of His children. Parents are coming to see more clearly that the discipline of children is largely a metaphysical problem. They are learning that all of God's children are governed harmoniously and continuously by divine will, and that this righteous government is manifest in proportion to their own right thinking and acting. They are learning more and more to leave their dear ones in God's hands, well knowing that divine ideas can never wander from His sight or venture beyond the influence of His love and care. In proportion as this understanding is clear, children thrive and grow in grace and the spirit of obedience, learning the unspeakable joy of living in harmony with God.

NEXT IN THIS ISSUE
Editorial
Truth Invincible
March 21, 1925
Contents

We'd love to hear from you!

Easily submit your testimonies, articles, and poems online.

Submit