The Supremacy of God

"By the word of the Lord were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth." Thus did the psalmist acknowledge the supremacy of God. The supremacy of God! How readily the words come to us; but how meager still is our understanding of them! There they are, however, standing out before the thinker, demanding his attention to the great spiritual truth which they enunciate so clearly and so emphatically. Hardly anything exposes the unreliability of the so-called human mind better than the fact that, although the supremacy of God has been tacitly admitted by men for untold generations, it is only within comparatively recent years that the attention of the world has been drawn by Christian Science to the truth as scientifically demonstrable.

Christ Jesus understood better than any other has ever done that God is supreme; and he demonstrated his understanding by healing all manner of disease and sin. John records, in the fifth chapter of his gospel, that after Jesus had healed a man by the pool of Bethesda on the Sabbath,—a man who had been diseased for "thirty and eight years,"—certain Jews took such violent exception to the gracious act that they "sought to slay him." Jesus' reply to their malice was not a vindication of himself as the doer of the good deed, but the simple statement, "My Father worketh hitherto, and I work." "Verily, verily, I say unto you, The Son can do nothing of himself, but what he seeth the Father do: for what things soever he doeth, these also doeth the Son likewise." The words clearly indicate that Jesus acknowledged the supremacy of God, and attributed to God the power whereby he healed the belief of sickness, which had persisted for almost forty years.

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Editorial
Health
September 30, 1922
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