Work and Rest

The fourth commandment has its foundation in a great human need, namely, the need of mankind to set aside a sufficient time in which to know God and His law, and to gain an ever advancing understanding of the blessings which follow obedience thereto. In modern times the requirements of this commandment are perhaps passed over with little thought as to their relation to all human need, and with an easy tolerance for the material sense which would usurp the place of spiritual sense in dealing with the subject involved.

Our wise Leader, Mrs. Eddy, has, however, made special provision in the Manual of The Mother Church (see Article XX, Sections 1–3) for the children who are being brought up under Christian Science influence; and so among the First Lessons taught in all Christian Science Sunday Schools we have the Ten Commandments. The utmost care is taken to impress upon the unfolding thought of childhood and youth the necessity for obedience to divine law, and the protection which this affords at all times and under all circumstances. While it is true that the children must study and repeat the commandments, as found in the twentieth chapter of Exodus, thought is lifted above the restrictive sense so often associated with the "Thou shalt nots" of the letter, to the sure results of understanding and obeying God, infinite Love, whose law is at all times loving and protective.

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Christian and Scientific
September 9, 1922
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