What does "the higher tribunal of public opinion" have...

Stroud (Gloucestershire, Eng.) News

What does "the higher tribunal of public opinion" have to say about the thousands of deaths from consumption which occur annually under medical treatment? Does it express the desire that "such cases cannot be given too much publicity," and does the writer think it "regrettable" that the doctors who attended such cases cannot, "under the circumstances, be made legally responsible for the 'foolish' people's death"?

The gentleman who so courageously hurls contumely at Christian Science, while hiding behind a pseudonym, might well be advised to keep more abreast of the widely discussed topics and great religious movements of the day. Were he to do so he would not be led into the mistake of describing such a world-wide movement as Christian Science is known to be by the inappropriate terms "pernicious and obscure." It certainly is not "pernicious," i.e., destructive, but grandly constructive, for it has brought life, joy, and a deep spiritual awakening into the lives of millions of people who in numberless cases were sunk in despair, helpless invalids, slaves to drink and other degrading habits, and without hope or God, and has healed them of sickness and sin. The uplifting influence of Christian Science is making itself felt above all the clamor of ignorant and prejudiced opposition; and the gross injustice of the attacks made upon it only serve to rouse in the hearts of all true English men and women the desire to see a spirit of fairness and open-mindedness displayed to all who, while holding different opinions, are one in their desire to relieve sick and suffering humanity. This spirit is certainly lacking in the article to which this reply is addressed, though, from the pseudonym adopted, one would have expected to find quite the reverse.

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