FROM OUR EXCHANGES

[Continent.]

The outstanding characteristic of the political campaign of the year 1912 is the sensitiveness of the electorate of the Republic to moral issues. The moral heights of a half century ago have been climbed again. The radical moral idea that the people must first of all do right for and by one another, no matter whether business prospers and parties win or not, begins to dominate once more the political thinking of the typical American. The potent note to command voters today, as the politicians have already come to recognize, is an appeal to their conceptions of fair play, just chances, and fearless loyalty to right. Platforms and stump speeches have not abandoned the old materialism wholly; there is still argument to attract the self-seeking. But above all this stands clear one significant fact: the party leaders of the present year are each and all counting for their hopes of victory on their ability to convince the people that their respective candidates represent the best expectation of cleaner, fairer, squarer, more wholesome life in the land.

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
October 26, 1912
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