Christian Science and the Individual

It is entirely true that man is the idea of Truth and never apart from Truth. For human beings, though, the truth of being must be assimilated. It must be taken piece by piece, digested in the understanding and confirmed in healing practice. And each one of us has his own adventure and experience in doing so. It's a mistake to relate one's spiritual progress to another's. Or to imagine that Christian Science should at once have equal meaning for every individual.

Our own enthusiasm for Christian Science may tempt us sometimes to hurry others into its study before they are spiritually—or humanly—set to do so. The best way to encourage others to take up this teaching is to consciously and animatedly identify ourselves as Life's reflection—to really be the spiritual emanation of Life, to be the real man. By contrast, undiscriminating enthusiasm for the conversion of others—unselective missionary work—may in fact evidence insensitiveness and mortal will. These two approaches—the first spiritual and effective, the second personal and not effective— are indicated in Mary Baker Eddy's definition of "zeal" in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures: "Zeal. The reflected animation of Life, Truth, and Love. Blind enthusiasm; mortal will." Science and Health, p. 599;

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Editorial
Speeding the Course of Justice
October 16, 1976
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