IT IS RIGHT TO CLAIM AFFLUENCE

In the Gospel of Mark is the story of one who came to Jesus asking what he should do to inherit eternal life. The Master cited six of the Mosaic commandments, whereupon his questioner replied that he had endeavored to obey them from the days of his youth. The Scriptural narrative then goes on to say that Jesus, beholding him, loved him, and said (10:21), "One thing thou lackest: go thy way, sell whatsoever thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven: and come, take up the cross, and follow me." This was a tremendous test which the Master offered of one's devotion to Truth and of one's love for things spiritual, and we read that the questioner "was sad at that saying, and went away grieved: for he had great possessions" (verse 22).

Certainly Christ Jesus was not advocating pauperism, nor indicating that his followers should be objects of charity. Palpably, he was going to the root of humanity's problem in the matter of worldly possessions; that is to say, mortals' love of money and belief in its power. This is apparent in his subsequent comment to his disciples (verse 24), "Children, how hard is it for them that trust in riches to enter into the kingdom of God!" That the Scriptures do not oppose the tenet of free enterprise and the gaining of a rightful sense of supply is indicated by such passages as the Old Testament prediction that in the fullness of time all shall sit under their own vines and fig trees, and the Master's promise that those who seek first the kingdom of God will find all needful things added unto them.

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Editorial
THE NEW NAME
March 20, 1948
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